Artist
Artist: Robyn Bracken
Curator
Curator: Sally Couacaud
Date Installed
Installed 1999
Location
Royal Botanic Gardens, 4 Macquarie Street, SYDNEY, 2000
Project
Project: Sydney Sculpture Walk
Tag
Tags: Site-specific, Water

Artwork Description

Mrs Biggs even had a bathing machine to attract the ladies

The Archaeology of Bathing by Robyn Backen reflects upon the history of bathing at Woolloomooloo Bay. The installation traces elements of the former Domain Baths for Ladies opened by Mrs Biggs in 1833, and recalls cultural attitudes in the new colony and the closeted modesty associated with the early days of bathing.

Woolloomooloo Bay has a long association with bathing. Gadigal people bathed here prior to and after European settlement, and it is along this shore that Sydney’s first baths were built. Since the first European settlement in Sydney there have been eleven different bathing establishments in Woolloomooloo Bay. Between 1883 and 1955 this part of the bay was the site of four separate ladies bathing establishments, including Mrs Biggs’ Ladies Baths and the Domain Baths for Ladies.

In The Archaeology of Bathing a concrete path defines the poolside deck and changing cubicles. Steel steps lead down from an entrance frame on the shoreline to a cage-like structure representing the old bathing machine, used to protect ladies from sharks and the attention of men while they bathed. The naval presence in Woolloomooloo Bay is signified by Morse code messages in lights around the entrance frame, triggered by people approaching the site.

A floating jetty leads out from the cage to navigational cardinals marking the perimeter of the original baths. The tidal movements of the jetty also draw our attention to the littoral – the slippage between high and low tide – which is an important element within the conceptual framework of the artist’s overall practice.

Artist

Robyn Backen is an interdisciplinary artist based in Sydney. She studied sculpture in Amsterdam and Salzburg under Marcus Lupertz and Edvardo Paolozzi. Backen’s sound, lightworks, projections and computer generated systems include the audience and actively engage with the spaces in which they inhabit. Her installations are often technologically complex yet are minimal in appearance. Systems become the subjects of her work, like those of language and code, classifying and remembering.

Inscriptions

Inscription in text and Morse code on the timber plaque:

Mrs Biggs / even had a / bathing machine / to attract / the ladies

Inscription on south wall of precast stairs (tidal markings):

MHW – R.L. 1.480 / MSL – R.L. 0.925’

Sydney Sculpture Walk Plaque

Archaeology of Bathing / Robyn Backen / The Woolloomooloo Bay shoreline has a long association with bathing. It was / used by the Cattigal people prior to and after European settlement and it is / along this shore that Sydney’s first baths were built. These baths nurtured / some of Australia’s greatest swimmers. Between 1833 and 1955 this area of / the bay was the site of four separate ladies bathing establishments – including / Mrs Biggs’ Ladies Baths and the Domain Baths for Ladies. / This artwork traces the perimeter of the former Domain Baths for Ladies. The elements form a collage / a floating jetty evokes the memory of the boardwalk and marks tidal changes / a concrete path defines the poolside deck and changing cubicles / a bathing machine is evoked by the stair, cage and portal frame to represent the closeted space of expected modesty associated with the early days of bathing / the portal frame of the bathing machine signals Morse code across the bay / Installed: June 1999.

Sydney Sculpture Walk

The Sydney Sculpture Walk was a major City of Sydney initiative for the 2000 Olympics and the 2001 Centenary of Federation, curated by Sally Coucaud.

Ten artworks were commissioned from leading Australian and international artists to form a circuit through the city from the Domain and Royal Botanic Gardens, through East Circular Quay and the city streets to Martin Place.

Each artwork was site-specific, addressing the historical and cultural aspects of its location and contributing to an appreciation and understanding of the city’s environment, history and character.

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